Here’s an interesting article that recently appeared in Slate in which the environmental impact of a film production is made all to clear.

" In fact, the movie was filmed in Namibia in the first place because of changing climate. For a decade or so, Miller planned to shoot the film in Australia, in the New South Wales desert town of Broken Hill. But freak rains have turned the formerly dry-as-an-apocalypse area into a field of bobbing wildflowers. Really. And fields of wildflowers, while they may be real signs of ecological calamity, do not read as such on the screen. So the film had to up and move to Namibia, which boasts a desert landscape—with a healthy but nearly invisible lichen crust—that appears properly damaged to Western eyes."

Stills from Tacita Dean’s FILM (2012), a monumental assertion of the continued importance and beauty of celluloid. I’m particularly interested in the way Dean uses images of landscape and the natural world to suggest a material permanence of the analog medium.

Stills from Tacita Dean’s FILM (2012), a monumental assertion of the continued importance and beauty of celluloid. I’m particularly interested in the way Dean uses images of landscape and the natural world to suggest a material permanence of the analog medium.

Ten Skies- James Benning (2004)

A Journey To Avebury (1971). Derek Jarman.

Site Specific: Las Vegas 05 (2005) Olivio Barbieri

Study of a River(1994). Peter Hutton.

Clouds. Chris Welsby, 1978.

Clouds. Chris Welsby, 1978.

Floral Co-operative Societies (1927). Percy Smith

Oliver Twist (1948) - David Lean

The Manxman (1929) - Alfred Hitchcock